Chipotle’s Cultivating Thought Series is Dead On

Let me start out by saying I’ve never met a burrito bowl I didn’t like. As far as I’m concerned, Chipotle is the master of guacamole, sustainability at scale and they have awesome commercials about the struggle that is the life of a scarecrow.

The brand has recently done something revolutionary in terms of content marketing. They’ve dedicated the valuable real estate on the cups and paper bags to an author series called Cultivating Thought. Yes, that’s right — Chipotle isn’t using their packaging to tout a new menu item, or use it as advertising like fellow fast food restaurants; they are using this space to showcase the original work of famous authors, thought-leaders and celebrities. These two-minute reads are funny, lovely and of course, thoughtful.

The mad genius behind the project, Jonathan Safran Foer happened to write my favorite two-minute read. Foer’s contribution is titled “Two-Minute Personality Test” and left me in such a trance after I read it that I had to share.

 

The following is Foer’s two-minute read:

 

“What’s the kindest thing you almost did?

Is your fear of insomnia stronger than your fear of what awoke you?
Are bonsai cruel?
Do you love what you love, or just the feeling?
Your earliest memories: do you look through your young eyes, or look at your young self?
Which feels worse: to know that there are people who do more with less talent, or that there are people with more talent?
Do you walk on moving walkways?
Should it make any difference that you knew it was wrong as you were doing it?
Would you trade actual intelligence for the perception of being smarter?
Why does it bother you when someone at the next table is having a conversation on a cell phone?

How many years of your life would you trade for the greatest month of your life?

What would you tell your father, if it were possible?
Which is changing faster, your body, or your mind?
Is it cruel to tell an old person his prognosis?
Are you in any way angry at your phone?
When you pass a storefront, do you look at what’s inside, look at your reflection, or neither?
Is there anything you would die for if no one could ever know you died for it?
If you could be assured that money wouldn’t make you any small bit happier, would you still want more money?
What has been irrevocably spoiled for you?
If your deepest secret became public, would you be forgiven?
Is your best friend your kindest friend?
Is it in any way cruel to give a dog a name?
Is there anything you feel a need to confess?
You know it’s a “murder of crows” and a “wake of buzzards” but it’s a what of ravens, again?
What is it about death that you’re afraid of? How does it make you feel to know that it’s an “unkindness of ravens”?

This seemingly haphazard list of questions inspires deep thought and reflection. Have you ever spent much time thinking about whether or not your best friend is your kindest friend? Well, now you have.

To sum up this therapy session, I’ve decided to share my answers to some of the questions that really resonated with me:

Would you trade actual intelligence for the perception of being smarter?
- Never. The pretense of pretending to be knowledgeable would be exhausting, and I’m lazy.

How many years of your life would you trade for the greatest month of your life?
- I would trade 5 years for one amazing month. We survive on the memories of our youth at the end. I’d want to make sure I had some damn good ones to take me out.

What would you tell your father, if it were possible?
- I’d tell my dad to stop worrying, he did everything right. I’d also tell him to be happy.

Are you in any way angry at your phone?
- If anyone answers yes to this question, I’m judging you.

What has been irrevocably spoiled for you?
- Ramen Noodles, politics, and the Green Bay Packers

Savannah

About Savannah

Blogger. Avid reader. Chocolate enthusiast. Lover of reading, creating and sharing interesting, informative content.